Friday, 1 April 2016

Maimeriblu watercolour chart

I had a lot of trouble finding the MaimerBlu colour chart, so here is a screenshot of their 2011 chart.
I haven't tried all the colours, but I'll add some painted swatches of the ones I have tried soon.




Here is a link to the Italian website, thanks you to an email from Faith.
Thanks to Winifred, I now have the whole range to add. Watch this space!

7 comments:

  1. Hi Jane, I'm your fan from Hong Kong. I can post you a full range (complete 72 colours) fresh squeeze dot card. They are semi moist, not like the Daniel Smith's dried up one. let me know if you're interested.

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    1. That would be terrific! Please send me an email at jane@janeblundellart.com and I'll give you an address :-) I have tried over half of them so can give you a list if you prefer not to have to do dots of all, though some I used were old stock.

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  2. What do the stars denote and what is gr?

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  3. Gr stands for "series" the larger the number the more expensive pigments

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    1. Thanks Winifred - I'd assumed it was granulation and it didn't make sense so I guess then it is effectively 'grade'.
      The stars refer to lightfastness, though since they are all the same they are not much use. I'll add the rest of the information from the colour chart you sent.

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  4. Hi Jane, Do you happen to know the granulation factor for the colors on the color chart? Also, do you happen to know if there are any color charts (MaimerBlu or otherwise) out there that show flow?

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    1. The granulation factor is inherent in the pigment really. You may be able to notice it more in my paint-outs here - https://janeblundellart.blogspot.com.au/search?q=maimeri+blu or by looking at the individual swatches on my website. Looking at the swatches on the Maimer Blu website is also helpful http://www.maimeri.it/it/categorie/acquerello/maimeri-blu.html

      Watercolour websites may state granulating or not granulating but they don't always. I find that it is useful to learn which are the most granulating pigments and look for those. For example, genuine ultramarine (PB29), cerulean (PB35 or 36) and cobalt blues (PB36 for the turquoise, PB28 for the blue) are granulating. So are many of the earth colours (PBR7 especially), Potters Pink (PR233), viridian (PG18) Mineral violet, ultramarine violet etc (PV14,15 and 16) also granulate. Phthalos and quinacridones are not. Most yellows, reds and oranges are not. Some pigments granulate in some forms but not in others - eg PR101 which is very granulating as Indian red, and venetian red, but not in W&N burnt sienna.

      As for flow - I think you mean the way the paint reacts when it touches water on the paper? Some 'explode' all over the page, others sit where you put them. As a guide, the smaller the pigment particle, the more they are likely to float and move all over the page. So phthalos and quinacridones, which have very small particles - tend to move dramatically. But there are many exceptions (heavier pigments that also move a lot) so really you just need to try them for yourself and get to know your colours.

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